Untitled

vegan-start:

Omega 3 Packed Nutritious Chocolate Chia Pudding ~ by me!

As we all know following a vegan lifestyle means no seafood which retracts a good source of omega 3 fatty acids. Omega 3 fatty acids are a vital element in your diet so it is important to make sure you are getting a sufficient amount. A great source of omega 3 fatty acids are chia seeds! In 1 serving of chia seeds (approx. 1 tbsp) there are 2.9g of omega 3, according to the Australia Heart Foundation they suggest to aim for approximately 3.5g weekly! Chia seeds are a great dense source of nutrition. They also have approx. 3.1g of protein per serving not to mention their great source in antioxidants, fibre and more!

Chocolate Chia Pudding

Ingredients

  • 2 Tbsp + Raw Chia Seeds
  • 1/2 Cup (if using more chia seeds use more milk with the 2 tbsp, 1/2 cup ratio) Of Non-Dairy Milk Of Choice: Coconut milk, almond milk, hazelnut, rice, oat etc.
  • Vegan-Friendly Chocolate Flavouring of Choice: cacao, cocoa, nesquik chocolate drink powder, cadbury drinking chocolate, melted chocolate etc.
  • (optional) Sweetener to taste: agave nectar, coconut sugar, raw sugar, natural sweeteners etc.
  1. Place chia seeds in desired serving dish with milk and (optional) sweetener.
  2. Stir to combine, trying to avoid clumping chia seeds.
  3. Refrigerate for at least 2 hours so the seeds can absorb and create optimal desired consistency! 
garden-of-vegan:

How To Prep & Freeze Fresh Fruit {step-by-step tutorial} via ilovevegan.com

beautifulpicturesofhealthyfood:

Banana, Oatmeal & Chocolate Chips Cookies - no flour, no egg & no sugar…RECIPE

beautifulpicturesofhealthyfood:

Skinny Shrimp Scampi with Zucchini Noodles…RECIPE

babylately:

A month or so ago I wrote this post about a new thing I was trying to encourage more healthy and home cooked meals for my family. I am happy to report that it worked out wonderfully for us, and tomorrow, I will have my third day of freezer meal prep. The original post was quite popular, so I…

afoodiepatootie:

Hey Guys! Happy FRIDAY!!! I really appreciate all of the love you guys have been sending me on here. There are WAY too many haters out there. I’m not perfect, I’ll never be. I’m flawed, this blog is flawed, but why hate?

Not to get all campfire song, but we all need to start being nicer to each…

Slow Cooker Freezer Meals

babylately:

image

I don’t love to cook dinner anymore. I haven’t loved cooking dinner ever, really.  I don’t think I have even really liked cooking dinner.  I do love anything that makes a mundane and necessary task easier.  Especially as a mom.  And even more now as a new mom of two. There are two things that make cooking dinner really great: Advanced preparation & a crockpot. Have I ever mentioned how much I love a good crockpot? Seriously, if I could marry my slow cooker, I would. Over the past few months I was enlightened with the brilliant phenomenon that are freezer meals.  Fully pepared, uncooked, frozen bags of food that you simply place in a slow cooker for 6-8 hours and have dinner with little to no effort.  To make things even easier on myself I make sure that I always have slow cooker liners on hand.  I did a gigantic batch of freezer meals today and while I made a lot of new recipes I haven’t tried yet, I thought I would share them here in an effort to save YOU time as well.

The first thing I did was scour the internet for some new recipes.  In recent months I have made teriyaki chicken, tortilla soup, and other various meals, but this time I wanted to branch out to other sorts of meat too. 

image

I wrote out 8 different recipes and then compiled a shopping list for all of the items I didn’t have on hand (which was most of the items, obviously).  I then went “grocery shopping” (ordered online at Harris Teeter & let them gather my things for me, of course). I picked up my groceries today and set to work putting all of the ingredients in gallon-sized freezer bags.

image

In total, 14 meals cost around $75.00 - this is an average of $5.35 per meal for a family of four (three eaters, but I eat enough for two people these days, so go with four). Not only that, but our meals will be easy and, for the most part, well balanced.  A couple of tips I have if you plan to embark on a freezer meal journey: 

  • DO  NOT buy store brand freezer bags.  Go with Hefty or Ziploc. I made that mistake one time and had SO MANY bags burst.  It was infuriating to have fully prepared meals exploding out of bags.
  • Make a list. Stick to it. Also, use your recipe list to group all of the items for each meal together before you prep anything.  This way, you wont use all of the pineapple for one meal when it is supposed to be used with three different meals, for example. 
  • Always put in your meat and loose ingredients first, then pour the sauce overtop - it just makes things easier.
  • Prelabel your bags before making the meals.  Seems obvious to me, but you never know ;)

Onto the recipes! Here are 8 different meal options that I made today. Recipes that make more than one day’s worth of food are noted as well:

Read More

healthy-vegan-cooking:

So you’ve got all these great fruits and vegetables and now we’re going to help you keep them at their freshest with these tips. These tips are from the Berkley Farmer’s Market which is a Zero Waste market! Here is a printable PDF of their original tip sheet. In the works here at Washington’s Green Grocer is a switch from plastic bags (although we use as few as we can get away with, while still keeping your produce from getting battered on it’s way to you) to only recyclable paper and reuseable cloth bags!  
HOW TO STORE VEGETABLES WITHOUT PLASTIC
Artichokes‐ place in an airtight container sealed, with light moisture.
Asparagus‐ place them loosely in a glass or bowl upright with water at room temperature. (Will keep for a week outside the fridge)
Avocados‐ place in a paper bag at room temp. To speed up their ripening‐ place an apple in the bag with them.
Arugula‐ arugula, like lettuce, should not stay wet! Dunk in cold water and spin or lay flat to dry. Place dry arugula in an open container, wrapped with a dry towel to absorb any extra moisture.
Basil‐ is difficult to store well. Basil does not like the cold, or to be wet for that matter. The best method here is an airtight container/jar loosely packed with a small damp piece of paper inside‐left out on a cool counter.
Beans, shelling‐ open container in the fridge, eat ASAP. Some recommend freezing them if not going to eat right away
Beets‐ cut the tops off to keep beets firm, (be sure to keep the greens!)by leaving any top on root vegetables draws moisture from the root, making them loose flavor and firmness. Beets should be washed and kept in and open container with a wet towel on top.
Beet greens‐ place in an airtight container with a little moisture.
Broccoli‐ place in an open container in the fridge or wrap in a damp towel before placing in the fridge.
Broccoli Rabe‐ left in an open container in the crisper, but best used as soon as possible.
Brussels Sprouts‐ If bought on the stalk leave them on that stalk. Put the stalk in the fridge or leave it on a cold place. If they’re bought loose store them in an open container with a damp towel on top.
Cabbage‐ left out on a cool counter is fine up to a week, in the crisper otherwise. Peel off outer leaves if they start to wilt. Cabbage might begin to loose its moisture after a week , so, best used as soon as possible.
Carrots‐ cut the tops off to keep them fresh longer. Place them in closed container with plenty of moisture, either wrapped in a damp towel or dunk them in cold water every couple of days if they’re stored that long.
Cauliflower‐ will last a while in a closed container in the fridge, but they say cauliflower has the best flavor the day it’s bought.
Celery‐ does best when simply places in a cup or bowl of shallow water on the counter.
Celery root/Celeriac‐ wrap the root in a damp towel and place in the crisper.
Corn‐ leave unhusked in an open container if you must, but corn really is best eaten sooner then later for maximum flavor.
Cucumber‐ wrapped in a moist towel in the fridge. If you’re planning on eating them within a day or two after buying them they should be fine left out in a cool room.
Eggplant‐ does fine left out in a cool room. Don’t wash it, eggplant doesn’t like any extra moisture around its leaves. For longer storage‐ place loose, in the crisper.
Fava beans‐ place in an air tight container.
Fennel‐ if used within a couple days after it’s bought fennel can be left out on the counter, upright in a cup or bowl of water (like celery). If wanting to keep longer than a few days place in the fridge in a closed container with a little water.
Garlic‐ store in a cool, dark, place.
Green garlic‐an airtight container in the fridge or left out for a day or two is fine, best before dried out.
Greens‐ remove any bands, twist ties, etc. most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth‐ to keep them from drying out. Kale, collards, and chard even do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge.
Green beans‐ they like humidity, but not wetness. A damp cloth draped over an open or loosely closed container.
Green Tomatoes‐ store in a cool room away from the sun to keep them green and use quickly or they will begin to color.
Herbs- a closed container in the fridge to kept up to a week. Any longer might encourage mold.
Lettuce‐ keep damp in an airtight container in the fridge.
Leeks‐leave in an open container in the crisper wrapped in a damp cloth or in a shallow cup of water on the counter (just so the very bottom of the stem has water).
Okra‐ doesn’t like humidity. So a dry towel in an airtight container. Doesn’t store that well, best eaten quickly after purchase
Onion‐ store in a cool, dark and dry, place‐ good air circulation is best, so don’t stack them.
Parsnips‐an open container in the crisper, or, like a carrot, wrapped in a damp cloth in the fridge.
Potatoes‐ (like garlic and onions) store in cool, dark and dry place, such as, a box in a dark corner of the pantry; a paper bag also works well.
Radicchio‐ place in the fridge in an open container with a damp cloth on top.
Radishes‐ remove the greens (store separately) so they don’t draw out excess moisture from the roots and place them in a open container in the fridge with a wet towel placed on top.
Rhubarb‐wrap in a damp towel and place in an open container in the refrigerator.
Rutabagas‐ in an ideal situation a cool, dark, humid root cellar or a closed container in the crisper to keep their moisture in.
Snap peas‐ refrigerate in an open container
Spinach‐ store loose in an open container in the crisper, cool as soon as possible. Spinach loves to stay cold.
Spring onions‐ Remove any band or tie and place in the crisper.
Summer Squash‐ does fine for a few days if left out on a cool counter, even after cut.
Sweet peppers‐ Only wash them right before you plan on eating them as wetness decreases storage time. Store in a cool room to use in a couple a days, place in the crisper if longer storage needed.
Sweet Potatoes‐ Store in a cool, dark, well‐ventilated place. Never refrigerate‐‐sweet potatoes don’t like the cold.
Tomatoes‐ Never refrigerate. Depending on ripeness, tomatoes can stay for up to two weeks on the counter. To hasten ripeness place in a paper bag with an apple.
Turnips‐ remove the greens (store separately) same as radishes and beets, store them in an open container with a moist cloth.
Winter squash‐store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place. Many growers say winter squashes get sweeter if they’re stored for a week or so before eaten.
Zucchini‐ does fine for a few days if left out on a cool counter, even after cut. Wrap in a cloth and refrigerate for longer storage.
HOW TO STORE FRUIT WITHOUT PLASTIC
Apples‐ store on a cool counter or shelf for up to two weeks. For longer storage in a cardboard box in the fridge.
Citrus‐ store in a cool place, with good airflow, never in an air‐tight container.
Apricots‐ on a cool counter to room temperature or fridge if fully ripe
Cherries‐store in an airtight container. Don’t wash cherries until ready to eat, any added moisture encourages mold.
Berries-Don’t forget, they’re fragile. When storing be careful not to stack too many high, a single layer if possible. A paper bag works well, only wash before you plan on eating them.
Dates‐dryer dates (like Deglet Noor) are fine stored out on the counter in a bowl or the paper bag they were bought in. Moist dates (like Medjool) need a bit of refrigeration if they’re going to be stored over a week, either in cloth or a paper bag‐ as long as it’s porous to keeping the moisture away from the skin of the dates.
Figs‐ Don’t like humidity, so, no closed containers. A paper bag works to absorb excess moisture, but a plate works best in the fridge up to a week un‐stacked.
Melons‐ uncut in a cool dry place, out of the sun up to a couple weeks. Cut melons should be in the fridge, an open container is fine.
Nectarines‐ (similar to apricots) store in the fridge is okay if ripe, but best taken out a day or two before you plan on eating them so they soften to room temperature.
Peaches (and most stone fruit)‐ refrigerate only when fully ripe. More firm fruit will ripen on the counter.
Pears‐ will keep for a few weeks on a cool counter, but fine in a paper bag. To hasten the ripening put an apple in with them.
Persimmon –Fuyu‐(shorter/pumpkin shaped): store at room temperature.–Hachiya‐ (longer/pointed end): room temperature until completely mushy. The astringentness of them only subsides when they are completely ripe. To hasten the ripening process place in a paper bag with a few apples for a week, check now and then, but don’t stack‐they get very fragile when really ripe.
Pomegranates‐ keep up to a month stored on a cool counter.
Strawberries‐ Don’t like to be wet. Do best in a paper bag in the fridge for up to a week. Check the bag for moisture every other day.

healthy-vegan-cooking:

So you’ve got all these great fruits and vegetables and now we’re going to help you keep them at their freshest with these tips. These tips are from the Berkley Farmer’s Market which is a Zero Waste market! Here is a printable PDF of their original tip sheet. In the works here at Washington’s Green Grocer is a switch from plastic bags (although we use as few as we can get away with, while still keeping your produce from getting battered on it’s way to you) to only recyclable paper and reuseable cloth bags!  

HOW TO STORE VEGETABLES WITHOUT PLASTIC
  • Artichokes‐ place in an airtight container sealed, with light moisture.
  • Asparagus‐ place them loosely in a glass or bowl upright with water at room temperature. (Will keep for a week outside the fridge)
  • Avocados‐ place in a paper bag at room temp. To speed up their ripening‐ place an apple in the bag with them.
  • Arugula‐ arugula, like lettuce, should not stay wet! Dunk in cold water and spin or lay flat to dry. Place dry arugula in an open container, wrapped with a dry towel to absorb any extra moisture.
  • Basil‐ is difficult to store well. Basil does not like the cold, or to be wet for that matter. The best method here is an airtight container/jar loosely packed with a small damp piece of paper inside‐left out on a cool counter.
  • Beans, shelling‐ open container in the fridge, eat ASAP. Some recommend freezing them if not going to eat right away
  • Beets‐ cut the tops off to keep beets firm, (be sure to keep the greens!)by leaving any top on root vegetables draws moisture from the root, making them loose flavor and firmness. Beets should be washed and kept in and open container with a wet towel on top.
  • Beet greens‐ place in an airtight container with a little moisture.
  • Broccoli‐ place in an open container in the fridge or wrap in a damp towel before placing in the fridge.
  • Broccoli Rabe‐ left in an open container in the crisper, but best used as soon as possible.
  • Brussels Sprouts‐ If bought on the stalk leave them on that stalk. Put the stalk in the fridge or leave it on a cold place. If they’re bought loose store them in an open container with a damp towel on top.
  • Cabbage‐ left out on a cool counter is fine up to a week, in the crisper otherwise. Peel off outer leaves if they start to wilt. Cabbage might begin to loose its moisture after a week , so, best used as soon as possible.
  • Carrots‐ cut the tops off to keep them fresh longer. Place them in closed container with plenty of moisture, either wrapped in a damp towel or dunk them in cold water every couple of days if they’re stored that long.
  • Cauliflower‐ will last a while in a closed container in the fridge, but they say cauliflower has the best flavor the day it’s bought.
  • Celery‐ does best when simply places in a cup or bowl of shallow water on the counter.
  • Celery root/Celeriac‐ wrap the root in a damp towel and place in the crisper.
  • Corn‐ leave unhusked in an open container if you must, but corn really is best eaten sooner then later for maximum flavor.
  • Cucumber‐ wrapped in a moist towel in the fridge. If you’re planning on eating them within a day or two after buying them they should be fine left out in a cool room.
  • Eggplant‐ does fine left out in a cool room. Don’t wash it, eggplant doesn’t like any extra moisture around its leaves. For longer storage‐ place loose, in the crisper.
  • Fava beans‐ place in an air tight container.
  • Fennel‐ if used within a couple days after it’s bought fennel can be left out on the counter, upright in a cup or bowl of water (like celery). If wanting to keep longer than a few days place in the fridge in a closed container with a little water.
  • Garlic‐ store in a cool, dark, place.
  • Green garlic‐an airtight container in the fridge or left out for a day or two is fine, best before dried out.
  • Greens‐ remove any bands, twist ties, etc. most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth‐ to keep them from drying out. Kale, collards, and chard even do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge.
  • Green beans‐ they like humidity, but not wetness. A damp cloth draped over an open or loosely closed container.
  • Green Tomatoes‐ store in a cool room away from the sun to keep them green and use quickly or they will begin to color.
  • Herbs- a closed container in the fridge to kept up to a week. Any longer might encourage mold.
  • Lettuce‐ keep damp in an airtight container in the fridge.
  • Leeks‐leave in an open container in the crisper wrapped in a damp cloth or in a shallow cup of water on the counter (just so the very bottom of the stem has water).
  • Okra‐ doesn’t like humidity. So a dry towel in an airtight container. Doesn’t store that well, best eaten quickly after purchase
  • Onion‐ store in a cool, dark and dry, place‐ good air circulation is best, so don’t stack them.
  • Parsnips‐an open container in the crisper, or, like a carrot, wrapped in a damp cloth in the fridge.
  • Potatoes‐ (like garlic and onions) store in cool, dark and dry place, such as, a box in a dark corner of the pantry; a paper bag also works well.
  • Radicchio‐ place in the fridge in an open container with a damp cloth on top.
  • Radishes‐ remove the greens (store separately) so they don’t draw out excess moisture from the roots and place them in a open container in the fridge with a wet towel placed on top.
  • Rhubarb‐wrap in a damp towel and place in an open container in the refrigerator.
  • Rutabagas‐ in an ideal situation a cool, dark, humid root cellar or a closed container in the crisper to keep their moisture in.
  • Snap peas‐ refrigerate in an open container
  • Spinach‐ store loose in an open container in the crisper, cool as soon as possible. Spinach loves to stay cold.
  • Spring onions‐ Remove any band or tie and place in the crisper.
  • Summer Squash‐ does fine for a few days if left out on a cool counter, even after cut.
  • Sweet peppers‐ Only wash them right before you plan on eating them as wetness decreases storage time. Store in a cool room to use in a couple a days, place in the crisper if longer storage needed.
  • Sweet Potatoes‐ Store in a cool, dark, well‐ventilated place. Never refrigerate‐‐sweet potatoes don’t like the cold.
  • Tomatoes‐ Never refrigerate. Depending on ripeness, tomatoes can stay for up to two weeks on the counter. To hasten ripeness place in a paper bag with an apple.
  • Turnips‐ remove the greens (store separately) same as radishes and beets, store them in an open container with a moist cloth.
  • Winter squash‐store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place. Many growers say winter squashes get sweeter if they’re stored for a week or so before eaten.
  • Zucchini‐ does fine for a few days if left out on a cool counter, even after cut. Wrap in a cloth and refrigerate for longer storage.

HOW TO STORE FRUIT WITHOUT PLASTIC

  • Apples‐ store on a cool counter or shelf for up to two weeks. For longer storage in a cardboard box in the fridge.
  • Citrus‐ store in a cool place, with good airflow, never in an air‐tight container.
  • Apricots‐ on a cool counter to room temperature or fridge if fully ripe
  • Cherries‐store in an airtight container. Don’t wash cherries until ready to eat, any added moisture encourages mold.
  • Berries-Don’t forget, they’re fragile. When storing be careful not to stack too many high, a single layer if possible. A paper bag works well, only wash before you plan on eating them.
  • Dates‐dryer dates (like Deglet Noor) are fine stored out on the counter in a bowl or the paper bag they were bought in. Moist dates (like Medjool) need a bit of refrigeration if they’re going to be stored over a week, either in cloth or a paper bag‐ as long as it’s porous to keeping the moisture away from the skin of the dates.
  • Figs‐ Don’t like humidity, so, no closed containers. A paper bag works to absorb excess moisture, but a plate works best in the fridge up to a week un‐stacked.
  • Melons‐ uncut in a cool dry place, out of the sun up to a couple weeks. Cut melons should be in the fridge, an open container is fine.
  • Nectarines‐ (similar to apricots) store in the fridge is okay if ripe, but best taken out a day or two before you plan on eating them so they soften to room temperature.
  • Peaches (and most stone fruit)‐ refrigerate only when fully ripe. More firm fruit will ripen on the counter.
  • Pears‐ will keep for a few weeks on a cool counter, but fine in a paper bag. To hasten the ripening put an apple in with them.
  • Persimmon –Fuyu‐(shorter/pumpkin shaped): store at room temperature.Hachiya‐ (longer/pointed end): room temperature until completely mushy. The astringentness of them only subsides when they are completely ripe. To hasten the ripening process place in a paper bag with a few apples for a week, check now and then, but don’t stack‐they get very fragile when really ripe.
  • Pomegranates‐ keep up to a month stored on a cool counter.
  • Strawberries‐ Don’t like to be wet. Do best in a paper bag in the fridge for up to a week. Check the bag for moisture every other day.

beautifulpicturesofhealthyfood:

Cauliflower Crust Garlic Bread Sticks -  Gluten-free, low-carb and so good you’re going to make this again, and again!…RECIPE

onegreenplanet:

Skip the Store and Try These DIY Vegan Protein Powders Instead